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What To Do While You Wait For A Tow

Posted by on November 20th, 2017 in Towing

Whether it’s due to a flat tire, a dead battery, or you’ve been in a minor accident, we’ve all had to wait for a tow truck before. Make the most of your time and stay safe while you wait by following these do’s and don’ts.

Before you leave the house, make sure you always have what you need – your license and other required documents, a cell phone (a battery charger helps!), and an emergency kit stored in your vehicle. Your emergency kit should have what you need to stay overnight in your car – a blanket, winter clothes, flashlight, snow scraper, etc.. Read the full list of recommended items here.

Here are the do’s and don’ts of waiting for a tow:

Do put on your hazard lights.

The first thing you do when you notice something isn’t right, should be to turn on those hazard lights. As soon as you do, surrounding vehicles and pedestrians will see this and be able to slow down and make room for you to pull over safely. Keep your hazard lights for as long as necessary, until you are able to be safely towed or leave the scene.

Do move over & get out of the way if safe to do so.

After putting on hazard lights, try to move out of the way of traffic as best as you can. If you are unsure if it’s safe, don’t hesitate to stay where you are, with the vehicle off and hazard lights on. Let your dispatcher know that you are in a traffic lane, so they can relay that information to your tow truck driver.

Do stay or go where it’s safe.

Remain in your vehicle if it is safe, but make sure to get out and stay a safe distance from it if there is any smoke or unknown fluid. Your vehicle can be a safe place to stay where you are protected from weather and other cars.

Don’t leave your personal belongings unattended.

Although it may be important to stay away from the car, stay within sight and don’t leave any personal belongings unattended while you wait.

Don’t accept rides from strangers.

Remain aware of your surroundings and avoid accepting a ride from a stranger. This can be extremely dangerous, especially at night. Make sure you keep your cell phone on you and have your battery charged, just in case you need to make an emergency call.

Don’t start doing roadside work on your own.

Sometimes drivers may lift the hood of their vehicle to indicate a broken down car. If you are trying to actually conduct work on the vehicle while roadside, be very careful. Without the proper signs, pylon cones, or notices to traffic, you are at risk of being severely injured or even killed. Wait for a professional to arrive and help.